Saturday, October 29, 2016

Pallone Statement on Fourth Anniversary of Superstorm Sandy


For Immediate Relsease:
Oct 28, 2016

LONG BRANCH, NJ – Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. released the following statement today on the upcoming fourth anniversary of Hurricane Sandy making landfall on the New Jersey coastline.

“As we look back on the four years since Superstorm Sandy changed the lives of so many in New Jersey, I am inspired by the resiliency of my neighbors and also focused on the work left to do to achieve a full recovery. From my first moments on the ground witnessing the damage Sandy wrought in New Jersey, I have remained committed to helping our communities rebuild and better prepare for future storms like Sandy. But I know that so many New Jerseyans are still struggling to rebuild their homes, and towns continue to work to rebuild critical facilities and infrastructure. There is much work still to be done.

“I will continue to do everything within my power to both help New Jersey rebuild and to prepare for future storms, and will continue to fight for critically needed reforms to the National Flood Insurance program, and many other recovery programs.”

“Just last week, I was proud to announce the second phase of construction for the Army Corps project at Port Monmouth, an important continuation of the Sandy recovery effort that will provide much needed protection from future storms.”

Congressman Pallone was a leader in the effort to authorize $60 billion in Superstorm Sandy relief funding, which was signed into law in January 2013. The funding package included federal aid to help homeowners, businesses, and communities recover, and resources to rebuild coastal, transportation, and water infrastructure.

Earlier this month, Pallone unveiled legislation, the Flood Insurance Reimbursement Standards Transparency (FIRST) Cap Profits Act, which would require increased oversight and transparency of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and to cap the profits of private companies providing flood insurance.

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